2011 Pacific Northwest Preservation Field School

Join us in Olympic National Park for the 17th annual Pacific Northwest Preservation Field School. For only the second time we are offering a two-week backcountry camping and working experience. This session focuses on the Peter A. Roose Homestead, a collection of farm related resources built at the turn of the 20th Century. The following two one-week sessions concentrate on the 1939 Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) built Sol Duc Falls Shelter. Each of the sessions includes seminars, workshops, hands-on experience, and field trips.
 

Schedule

Session One: Peter A. Roose Homestead
August 14th – 26th

Session Two: Sol Duc Falls Shelter
August 28th – September 2nd

Session Three: Sol Duc Falls Shelter
September 4th – 9th
 

Purpose

Each year the Pacific Northwest Preservation Field School attracts a range of participants, from practicing cultural resource professionals to undergraduate and graduate students, to novices with little background in the field but who possess a love for heritage and a desire to learn.  The University of Oregon's Historic Preservation Program developed this Field School to provide participants with the opportunity to experience preservation firsthand. Incoming graduate students are required to enroll for at least one session as part of their graduation requirements.

The field school is intended for anyone interested in working in a hands-on environment, to learn about preservation by doing it, and interested in seeing a spectacular part of the United States. The typical class varies in age, skill-background, and interest, but the common thread is always fun and learning. Many participants have used the field school to launch into historic preservation, and many graduates of the University of Oregon's program got their start at the Pacific Northwest Field School.

Pacific Northwest Field School
 

Olympic National Park

Olympic National Park, originally a Forest Service elk reservation, became a National Park in 1938. The coastal strip where the Peter A. Roose Homestead is located was added in 1953. It is currently 922,651 acres in size and features 130 historic structures, over 650 archeological sites, and 4 certified and 27 potential cultural landscapes. Its ecosystems range from the stunning Pacific Ocean coastline to glacier crowned mountains and lush rain forests. The park, located on the Olympic Peninsula, the park sits at the northwestern edge of the contiguous United States. Nearby towns and communities include Port Townsend, Port Angeles, and Forks.


Peter A. Roose Homestead & Sol Duc Falls Shelter

The Homestead

Settled at the turn of the 20th Century by Swedish settler Peter A. Roose, the homestead is located roughly a mile west of Ozette Lake on the western edge of the Olympic National Park. The historic subsistence farm site, situated in a prairie, includes the farmstead house, a well, a reconstructed barn, root cellar, and multiple types of wood fencing. The prairie, surrounded by thick evergreen forest, is just inland of the Pacific Ocean. The buildings, site, and larger cultural landscape create a unique and wonderful resource that displays the everyday life and transformation of a subsistence farmer on the western edge of the Olympic Peninsula.

Homestead
The Shelter

The Sol Duc Falls Shelter, constructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps in August 1939, is situated above the dramatic Sol Duc Falls along the Sol Duc Falls Trail. The symmetrical shelter features a wood shake roof, exposed log construction, saddle notch corner connections and a large fire pit set beneath the front gable porch. The shelter, funded by the Public Works Administration (WPA), represents a fine example of the rustic style. It is 40 miles west of Port Angles and is accessed by a short hike that is just under a mile. The shelter is surrounded by dense forests, trickling streams and near the Sol Duc River and waterfall.

Sol Duc Falls Shelter


Cost & Academic Credit

Field School participants can earn two graduate or undergraduate level credits from the University of Oregon for each repeatable one-week session, grading is on a pass/no pass basis.  Tuition costs are included in the field school fee, though participants will pay the same fee regardless of whether they wish to receive college credit.  Please send an academic transcript and letter of recommendation with your application if you wish to receive credit.

Tuition for each of the repeatable one-week sessions is $900.00 while for the two-week session is $1350.00. A $400.00 deposit is required with the application and the remaining $500.00 or $950.00 can be paid by check upon arrival. All checks should be made payable to the University of Oregon.

Field School Scholarships

Financial assistance is available through two scholarships.  Scholarship funds will only be disbursed to those participants who are taking the session(s) for academic credit.

The Pilgrim's Progress Preservation Services Student Scholarship Fund covers the expense of one Field School week. Preference will be given, but is not limited to, individuals who are working with a not-for-profit organization who without funding assistance would not be able to attend the Field School. This award covers tuition for one week of field school.

The Director's Student Scholarship is available, but not limited to, individuals planning a career in the preservation field, who without this funding assistance may not be able to attend the Field School.  The recipient must be taking the Field School session(s) for academic credit.  The award covers tuition for one field school week and additional travel expenses.

If you have any inquires regarding the scholarships please contact Carl Williams, the Field School GAF.

 
Application

Please find the 2011 Pacific Northwest Preservation Field School application linked below.
Space is limited so priority will be given to applications received before May 2nd, 2011.

Please send a completed application, statement of interest and deposit to:
Pacific Northwest Field School
Historic Preservation Program
School of Architecture & Allied Arts
5233 University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403-5233


Transportation & Directions

The range of transportation options available to students for the 2011 Field School sites are detailed in the PDF below.

Session One students working on the Peter A. Roose Homestead will meet at the Clinton Ferry Docks in Clinton, WA on Sunday, August the 14th at 4:00pm.

Session Two and Three students working on the Sol Duc Falls Shelter will either be picked from the bus station or airport in Port Angeles or meet directly at the Olympic Park Institute, depending on their means of transportation. Students should arrive either in Port Angeles or the Olympic Park Institute on the Sunday (August 28th or September 4th) of the participating week by 4:00pm.

 

Field School Faculty

Sessions will be led by one or more professionals specializing in the techniques and materials involved. Faculty come from across the Northwest and participate, as well as teach, in the Field School. Past faculty at The Pacific Northwest Field School have come from the U.S. National Park Service, U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Oregon State Department of Parks & Recreation, Oregon State University, the University of Oregon, Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission, Washington State Office of Archaeology & Historic Preservation, and the professional community.

The following is a preliminary list of the primary instructors for the Field School:

Shannon BellShannon Bell is a co-director of the Pacific Northwest Preservation Field School, an adjunct Historic Preservation professor at the University of Oregon, and a consultant in historic architecture. She maintains a consulting practice that focuses on historic architecture and her research interests include, preservation technologies and box construction in the Pacific Northwest. Shannon, a graduate from both the University of Oregon's Architecture and Historic Preservation program, currently teaches a field recordation, condition assessment, and HABS sequence for the University of Oregon’s historic preservation program.

 

Don PetingDonald Peting, Emeritus Architecture and HP faculty, is the founder of the Preservation Field Schools and is currently serving with Professor Bell as co-director of the summer program here in the Northwest. He is occasionally teaching part time in such areas as architectural design, preservation technology, and historic structures. He is an historical architect and maintains a consulting practice that focuses on 19th and early 20th century architecture and his research interests include traditional building technologies, early powered mills, and seismic retro-fitting of historic structures. He has been a Fellow of the American Academy in Rome since 1978. In 2005, the National Council for Preservation Education honored his educational career with their James Marston Fitch lifetime achievement award.

 

John PlatzJohn Platz has been actively involved with the Pacific Northwest Field School since its inception in 1995, initially as the leader of the Heritage Structures Team of the U.S. Forest Service of the Mount Hood National Forest, a preservation team he formed over 20 years ago. His skill at the use of traditional carpentry, particularly in timber framing, log construction, and 19th century building technology, was responsible for the early success of the Field School. Over ten years ago, he established Pilgrims Progress Preservation Services, a highly regarded professional practice doing significant preservation work throughout the west. In addition to teaching in the field school each summer, he has been involved in a number of HP courses during the school year, most recently the construction of a French Canadian trapper’s cabin at Kanaka Village at Fort Vancouver. He is a highly respected teacher, craftsperson and mentor of many of preservationist in the Pacific Northwest.

 

Amy McCauleyAmy McCauley is the owner of Oculus Fine Carpentry, Inc., a window and door specialty business. She has been working in construction for the past 13 years in the Portland-Metro area, six of them devoted to developing Oculus. Her emphasis is in working with traditional tools and techniques; some of her notable projects include the Pioneer Courthouse, A.T. Smith House, Delaney-Edwards House, Virgil Crum House and the Gardener’s House at Shore Acres State Park.

 

Michael HaydenMichael Hayden has worked as a mason for more than 27 years and has experience with brick, cinder block and various kinds of stone, both natural (his favorite) and synthetic. He worked on the restoration of the charcoal kilns in Gilmore, Idaho and on the historic Stanrod House here in Pocatello. Hayden spent 5 weeks at the bottom of the Grand Canyon helping with the construction of the stone waste treatment facility at Bright Angel Campground and more than a year during the 1990's working on a 21,000 square foot stone structure in the Jackson Hole area as well as many more projects both large and small. He is looking forward to helping at the Pacific Northwest Field School.

 

Leland RothLeland Roth is an Architectural History Professor at the University of Oregon. Books authored include: A Concise History of American Architecture, American Architecture: A History, and McKim, Mead & White, Architects. Professor Roth is also the editor of America Builds and co-editor of Architecture in Colonial America.

 

Fred WaltersFred Walters is an award winning historical architect and architectural conservator in Cambridge, Idaho. He holds architecture licenses in Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Nevada. His work includes building condition assessment and evaluation of over 240 buildings, as well as design and construction services for a wide variety of preservation projects. Walters has been an adjunct professor at the University of Oregon, teaching courses in Preservation Technology and Condition Assessments. He has been an active member of the field school since 1999.

 

Other past faculty at the Field School have come from the U.S. National Park Service, U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Oregon State Parks and Recreation Department, Oregon State University, the University of Oregon, and the professional community.

Historic Preservation Program
School of Architecture & Allied Arts
5233 University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403-5233

Field School Assistant/GAF
Email: pnwfs@uoregon.edu
Office: 541-346-2089
Fax: 541-346-3626

Field School Co-Director
Shannon M. S. Bell, Adjunct Faculty
Email: smsbell@mac.com

Field School Co-Director
Don Peting, Professor Emeritus
Email: peting@uoregon.edu
Office 541.346.2993
Mobile: 541.954.9248

For more information:
pnwfs@uoregon.edu
541-346-2089
 

Sponsors

The Pacific Northwest Preservation Field School would not be possible without the continued support of federal, state, and local agencies. Collaborating sponsors for the 2011 Pacific Northwest Preservation Field School include:

  • University of Oregon
  • National Park Service
  • Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation
  • Idaho State Historical Society
  • Oregon Parks & Recreation Department
  • Oregon State Historic Preservation Office
  • Oregon State University
  • Washington State Parks & Recreation Commission
  • Washington State Department of Archaeology & Historic Preservation


Contact

Historic Preservation Program
School of Architecture & Allied Arts
5233 University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403-5233

Field School Assistant/GAF
Email: pnwfs@uoregon.edu
Office: 541-346-2089
Fax: 541-346-3626

Field School Co-Director
Shannon M. S. Bell, Adjunct Faculty
Email: smsbell@mac.com

Field School Co-Director
Don Peting, Professor Emeritus
Email: peting@uoregon.edu
Office 541-346-2993
Mobile: 541-954-9248